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Grow the Love on April 7, 2016

ArkansasGivesApril7Between 8 AM and 8 PM on Thursday, April 7, you can change Wildwood Park for the Arts and Arkansas for the better.

ArkansasGives is a 12-hour statewide online giving event sponsored by Arkansas Community Foundation. Visit ArkansasGives.org between 8 AM and 8 PM on Thursday, April 7, and select Wildwood Park for the Arts in the drop down menu.

And make your dollars count even more! On ArkansasGives Day, each nonprofit is eligible to qualify for additional dollars through a matching pool of funds from Arkansas Community Foundation. All participating nonprofits will receive a portion of the matching pool. The more a nonprofit raises, the more bonus dollars it will receive. Even small nonprofits receive matching funds!

We’ll make it really easy for you! Let us help you help Wildwood! With your permission, Wildwood will make a courtesy call or email a personal reminder to you on April 7th. Simply contact Mary Bea Gross, Wildwood’s development officer, at marybea@wildwoodpark.org

As an extra incentive, by making a gift to Wildwood Park for the Arts during this 12-hour giving period, your impact will be DOUBLED thanks to a generous matching gift from a Wildwood supporter. When you choose to give to Wildwood Park, your gifts will be matched dollar-for-dollar, up to $10,000, on this special day of giving. 

Take a few minutes to give to Wildwood Park for the Arts on ArkansasGives Day April 7th! Your contribution will be matched by our supporter, and Wildwood will receive Arkansas Community Foundation funds as well – a perfect trifecta of giving!

When you give on ArkansasGives Day, you are joining a statewide celebration of giving and can help Wildwood raise even more dollars to support the Park’s mission to enrich the lives of Arkansans of all ages by creating community through nature and the arts.

Join us in supporting Wildwood Park for the Arts on ArkansasGives Day April 7th. Together we can make a difference!

ArkansasGives donations are online only through the ArkansasGives website, credit card only, for 12 hours only on April 7th, and in a minimum donation level of $25 (no maximum).arkansasgives-color

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LANTERNS! 2016 Lights Up the Night

Lanterns2016SliderWildwood’s annual deep-winter festival celebrates the first full moon of the lunar new year. Held over three magical evenings – February 19 – 21, 2016 – guests are transported to far away lands and times as they stroll through the beautifully lit pathways of Wildwood’s gardens. Cultural vistas feature live entertainment, food, drink, games and more throughout the Park’s Butler Arboretum and inside the Lucy Lockett Cabe Festival Theatre. Find out more information about LANTERNS! here.

Shuttles run from the Kroger on Chenal Parkway beginning at 6 pm nightly until 30 minutes past the Festival’s closing. Limited parking is also available at Wildwood.

Tickets are $8 for adults online and $10 at the gate. For children ages 6-12 tickets are $4 online and $5 at the gate, and children 5 and under attend FREE! LANTERNS! Let’s get glowing! Click here and then on the time of your chosen night to PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

Click here if you are interested in becoming a WILDVolunteer for this exciting festival!

LANTERNS! is made possible by the support of these illuminating sponsors:

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Father’s Day Fishing – Sunday, June 21

Wildwood’s Swan Lake will be open for catch and release fishing on Sunday, June 21 from noon until 5pm.

This is the only day the lake is open for fishing. Guests are invited to bring their own fishing poles and bait. Drinks, snacks, and bait will be available for purchase.

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Art in the Park: An Interview with Artist Lisa Krannichfeld

Meet Lisa Krannichfeld, exhibiting artist featured in Symbiotic: Art, Nature & Spirituality April 2 – May 10

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How do you describe your subject matter or the content of your work?

My focus is mostly on women. I find them to be so complex, playing so many roles throughout their lives.  The women I paint aren’t necessarily specific people but rather specimens of emotions that relate to viewers in different ways based on their own life experiences. Putting the emphasis on the emotional expression in my work is also kind of therapeutic for me, since I’m such a naturally reserved person. 

What mediums do you work with?

Currently, Chinese ink, watercolor, and resin are my main mediums of choice, although I love trying to mix new materials in when I can.

Besides your art practice, are you involved in any other kind of work?

I teach art full time in addition to making my own art. Sometimes it fuels me, and sometimes it just wears me out! 

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What are you presently inspired by— are there particular things you are reading, listening to or looking at to fuel your work?

I find the most inspiration from my failures, ironically. The process of trying something and failing at it is the best way to find new doors to walk through.  

Learn more about Lisa at http://lisakrannichfeld.com.

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Interns Sought for Summer WAMA Sessions

Interested in sharing your talents with our WAMA students? Become an intern!

Fill out the form below if you are interested in learning more about WAMA’s many intern opportunities in both the Instrumental and Vocal Program. After submitting the form, we will contact you with the complete 2015 WAMA Intern Application via email.

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Art in the Park: An Interview with Artist Amanda Hubbard

I asked myself what I want do with my life? What do I want to spend my life doing? Where do I feel comfortable? I realized I wanted to be where I am learning and growing but also feel like myself at the same time. Art it was, for sure.

Arkansas runs deep for Amanda Hubbard. A native of Redfield, a railroad town on the edge of the delta, Hubbard grew up designing, making, and creating. It started with an “aluminum foil purse for my Grandma, my Nanny,” she said. In school she loved her art classes, and when she studied art in the Arkansas Governor’s School summer program she finally found her utopia. “They had art, music, psychology, and film – all these different things. And no TV’s – it was a long time ago, so no cell phones either. We had to entertain ourselves, which allowed us to be more creative.”

After earning a Bachelor and Master Degree in Sociology, she knew there was something lacking: “Not being able to use my creativity as much as I believe I need in my life. I figure you’re given these gifts, these abilities, and then you don’t use them. It’s like something you enjoy doing, but you never get to do it.” Finally, after a birthday she was honest with herself. “I asked myself what I want do with my life? What do I want to spend my life doing? Where do I feel comfortable? I realized I wanted to be where I am learning and growing but also feel like myself at the same time. Art it was, for sure.”

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How do you think your sociology background has affected your painting? Do you see a connection or do you see this as a new adventure?

I am glad you asked that. Sometimes I see different things in other people’s work; I don’t notice themes so much about mine. If people are talking about their art or I see something, it makes the connection with sociology, like feminism or things like that. It’s always kind of there, but certain things spark it at different times. There is nothing I am consciously connecting between my painting and sociology.

 

 

Is there any inspiration behind your process or is it about the physical act of painting?

I think I draw inspiration from being in the moment and being very present and very conscientious of what you do. I am not sure how I am going to do my thesis show yet. I am trying to figure out if I need to feel a specific emotion to paint that emotion at that moment. It’s hard to be in the present all of the time, so of course you are going on memories here and there. I go from being in the present, to being in the past, to being in the present, to being in the future all of the time. To me, that’s very challenging. I don’t look at anything when I paint. If I were more of a realist I would have something to look at and I would go off of that. I don’t do that as an effort to be in the present.

 

I feel like being in the present is a constant struggle as a painter. How do you paint something new without thinking about all of that history, the baggage of paintings before you?

You’d have to have amnesia. I focus on trying to be in the present, that mindfulness of trying to be. It makes you more aware when you are not. That’s part of it. I really try to be in the present but also pepper it with the past and the future.

 

How does your studio process work? Can you describe your average day in the studio?

I usually work on the weekends, I love being in the studio at school when no one is there. It takes a while to get my things out. I have different things in different places. I usually try to do more than one painting at a time. Last night I did three. So I have gallons of paint that are separated into smaller jars. I mix different colors of acrylic enamel house paint from primary colors. I use large and rectangular Tupperware containers to store the colors I have already mixed. I have them because I thought that would be the best for my large brushes. When I first started I was experimenting with brooms and things. I need something large. I got back in touch with how to mix my own colors.

Then I pull brushes and I just start going. I just start. I really, over time, have learned not to fret or manipulate. I can’t keep messing with it, or else my paintings turn out horrible. Now I just dive in, I just go until I feel like it’s at the line where I feel like it is complete. There is that fine line between painting too much and not enough. I try to find that line.

 

Do you work at multiple paintings at the same time?

I do one at a time. I was thinking I might want to try to do two at the same time, like Joan Mitchell does her paintings. I read that because her paintings were so large she divided them in half to make them more manageable. I think that is something I will try in the future.

 

How long do you spend on one painting?

I spent over an hour to do three last night. But I am working a lot of that time and I am looking. So its not like I am listening to music or that kind of thing. I am doing actual painting during that entire time.

 

When you finish do you ever come back to the painting and do another layer of paint?

Usually, when I finish, that’s it. I started off doing traditional landscapes before the more abstract. I started with 8 inch by 10 inch canvases, and those were more layered in the beginning. With the bigger ones, I just want that moment in time to be captured. To me it’s more difficult to go back to fix something; it just doesn’t work that well. It’s missing the present moment. I thought about trying it, but I don’t know how it’s going to roll out.

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Do you have a project plan when you work? Like how many paintings to display in a space?

It’s as it comes. I try not to expect too much. I know by doing you just got to do. It may not be the best, it may not be a masterpiece, but you are doing. It’s an art practice, so you are practicing. Like some people practice a piano, you have to practice painting. That way of thinking just came about. I used to think each piece had to be a gem. But over time I got over that and realized each piece may not be a masterpiece. If it’s not, I’m like, “Hey I can just paint over it, that’s okay to.” I not try to be too attached.

 

Any artists you’ve been specifically looking to for inspiration?

I was looking initially at Richard Diebenkorn and his topography pieces. I like how he took landscapes but made them into abstractions. I liked his colors. Then I became interested in de Kooning and his spontaneous, painterly marks. He seemed to express a lot of emotion in his painting. I have a similar process to Joan Mitchell, style not so much. I had never heard of her until recently and felt cheated that I had never heard of her before. It’s terrible. I took a woman in art and music class and she was in that book, but I dont know if we ever touched on her. There are not a lot of women artists that are really studied and given the kudos that they deserve.

 

Especially in abstract expressionism.

Jackson Pollock and the men got all of the accolades. I would really love to see Joan Mitchell’s work in person someday. To me, it looks huge and all encompassing.

 

How do you choose your colors?

I pull a little from de Kooning and Diebenkorn. Diebenkorn the earthy tones, and de Kooning the bright colors. Last night I had a tank top and pair of underwear right next to each other, and I thought to myself, “I really like those colors; I’ll have to mix those up.” I think its just colors I really like together or that catch my attention.

 

How often do you refresh your palette? How many Tupperware are we talking at one time?

About ten at one time. If I get an idea for a color I just mix it up. I have a contractors’ paint sample fan that a neighbor gave to me. I think I might start taking my colors to Home Depot to get them mixed in large quantities. I didn’t know what colors I wanted a gallon of until recently. It’s a commitment. I think I am going to have them mix specific colors that I have figured out that I like. As time goes on I will probably keep adding to that palette.

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How would you describe the art community in Little Rock?

I think it’s growing. I know I had been out of the community for a few years, and I think the art scene is definitely more accessible if you are a student. It seems like you find out more about things that are going on, like artist talks. I can compare being in class to not since I have moved back in 2006, and I know a lot more than I did by being at UALR.

 

What have you found to be the best way to talk to other artists or your audience?

I talk with most artists through classes, my peers and professors. I have friends who are artists and that helps to have friends in the greater community. My friend Robert Bean organizes art events here. My brother is a photographer, so he hears about stuff. Facebook is really helpful to get invited to different events and things.

 

Have you used social media to get your work out to a wider audience?

When I’ve had artist receptions I’ve invited people via Facebook. I post paintings as I’m working on social media. When I’m watching the paint dry, literally, I’ll post pictures. Its fun to show people what your doing.

 

I love the drips.

Sometimes I have water. I use a spray bottle. I erase sometimes with any kind of color. I like painting over other paintings, so the painting before shows through the current one. For Puerto Viejo I used a broom for the blue going into the red, I was experimenting with that. I tried a sponge, a tampon. I tried whatever I could get to get different strokes. Right now I have up to five-inch paintbrushes. I love that I have everything from really small to 5 inches.

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What’s the biggest size canvas you have used?

36 by 48 probably. I have some bigger canvases at my house I am hoping to give a whirl. I am hoping to work bigger because it feels like it encompasses you more, but I also think you can get the point across at a smaller size.

 

What is exciting you the most right now?

I love the 5-inch brush. I think it’s a deck painting brush to do stains. I got a couple of those that I like to use. I think now the choice comes from figuring out which brush size to use, of course color too, but I have such a range in brush size now. In the beginning I focused on minimal strokes with bigger brushes, but that works sometimes and sometimes it doesn’t. I think I go back and forth. Like last night I tried to see how few strokes I could use to make what I wanted to make. That’s a challenge in and of itself. It’s all a part of not expecting a masterpiece. You just have to try it. I don’t know how successful you could be if everything you worked on turned out great.

 

What’s next for you?

I am applying to graduate school for my MFA. I hope to learn a lot from being around a group of artists. I think it really helps to be around people who can give you honest feedback and constructive criticism. The energy that comes from that is helpful. I’m really looking forward to learning and the experience of it in and of itself.

 

Do you have any goals for your work? Do you see it in a gallery space or in someone’s home?

I would really like to teach, to be an art professor at a university, because I think it’s really important that people express themselves. There are few places you can really do that besides the arts. Those are the places where you can express yourself freely, and there are no boundaries or limitations. As a teacher, I can do my work but also inspire students as they inspire me. It sounds like a nice way of living.

 

How would you describe being a successful artist?

That’s a really good question. I’m not really sure. I think it depends on what your definition is. I think that for me if I do work and people see it, whatever shape or form that is, I think it’s successful. If someone buys it, that might be successful, too.

A painting is successful when I like the painting when I am done. Actually liking something that you have done and being able to own it – that’s part of being successful, too. You might do something and someone likes it, but what’s the point if you don’t like it.

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Holiday Hours at Wildwood Park

Wildwood Park for the Arts will be closed December 24, 25, and 26.

Wildwood will be open from 9am until 12pm on December 31, and will be closed all day on January 1.

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Announcing WILDKids Cook! Winter Classes

We are delighted to invite your children and teens ages 8 and up to register and join us for WILDKids Cook! January 25, February 1, and February 8 from 2:00-4:00 PM. Faith Anaya from Kids Cook! Arkansas will be sharing some creative recipes that will give your WILDKid hands on experience in the kitchen. Space is limited to only 12 students, so please register soon to ensure your child’s participation. Each class will have a different menu, so sign up for as many as you like!

Click here to register for all 3 classes for just $150

Click here to sign up for individual classes for $55.

Gifts

Give the Gift of Wildwood

Give the gift of Wildwood with three exciting event packages for Wildwood’s spring season!

Concert

For the music lover in your life, the Concert Package is the perfect gift. Enjoy all three of Wildwood’s spring concerts, a $90 value, for just $70. Click here to purchase this package.

 

Weekend pass

If you know someone who has always wanted to see the world, Wildwood’s Weekend Pass is the perfect gift. This package combines a performance by the world renowned Vienna Boys Choir with a ticket to Wildwood’s annual LANTERNS! Festival that celebrates the diverse cultures of the world. A $45 value for just $35, you can reserve your seat here. 

 

Festival

 

If you’re shopping for someone who loves food and fun, Wildwood’s Festival Package is gift you’ve been looking for. This package combines a two of Wildwood’s most popular events: the LANTERNS! Festival celebrating global culture, and the Wine & Food Festival that brings together some of the best chefs in Little Rock and over one hundred wines for festival goers to sample. Purchase this package here.